Northwest Victims Tricked Into Calling Scammers Fake Support Number

There seems to be some hilarious tomfoolery going on where victims are tricked into calling a fake support number via email. The worst part is the scammer’s effort or IQ level, put some effort loser, but I digress. The worst part seems to be it targeting the poor (those experiencing financial hardship if you want to be P.C.) as they would be most likely to panic and call. Beware if you’re lucky enough to fall for it, you are further exploited into giving account details, credit cards numbers, nuclear codes, etc. The scam is some basic sh*t but for the uninitiated, it can spell a bad week or month/s of the recovery process. So the moral of the post is if you get a shady email telling you to thank you for your some unknown purchase from Amazon (or wherever), with a crazy price, support numbers listed in the same email multiple times… I’d probably call it, f*ck it.

No, no, don’t call. Validate the sender’s address, no support email from any big company will come from Gmail or Hotmail, it will come from the companies domain. If you’re still in doubt, don’t panic, do a quick search on Google, look up the company visit the site, look up their support information, and contact them. Don’t be a statistic.

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Miguel

I’m a bilingual Network Engineer. I have over 20 Years of Professional experience in Computer Science & Information Technology. I currently own and operate Web Semantics (www.websemantics.com) in Vancouver, Washington. I provide bilingual (English & Spanish) enterprise-level IT support to small and medium-sized businesses across the West Coast.

Soy un ingeniero de redes bilingüe. Tengo más de 20 años de experiencia profesional en ciencias de la computación y tecnología de la información. Actualmente poseo y opero Web Semantics (www.websemantics.com) en Vancouver, Washington. Proporciono soporte de IT/Informática bilingüe (inglés y español) a nivel empresarial a pequeñas y medianas empresas en toda la costa oeste.

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